Romancelandia

Review: A Conspiracy of Whispers, by Ada Hunter

[fa icon="calendar'] Jul 17, 2018 10:00:00 AM / by Ana Coqui posted in review

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Review: Perfect Rhythm, by Jae

[fa icon="calendar'] Jul 16, 2018 10:00:00 AM / by Margrethe Martin posted in review

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Whenever I stumble upon a romance with an asexual or a-spec character, I’m always a mix of “I need to read this to judge!” and “It’s probably a mess.” And because, more often than not, they are messy with the a-spec representation, these books are a challenge. Add to that seeing your sexuality as the primary conflict in a romance, which always stings a bit. I had been circling Perfect Rhythm for a few months, but jumped in when I saw the audiobook on Hoopla.

And Perfect Rhythm got asexuality mostly right, and it’s also a pretty good book. It’s not perfect, but it’s not the disaster I feared.

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Review: Claiming the Highlander’s Heart, by Lily Maxton

[fa icon="calendar'] Jul 13, 2018 10:00:00 AM / by Margrethe Martin posted in review

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Sometimes when I read a historical romance (especially a Regency), I have to remember that some of these books are not based on reality.* In this alternate reality for regencies, there can be some notable suspension of disbelief (e.g., maids and governesses marry dukes, women are crimelords, earl’s sisters run off to join Scottish bandits). I really enjoyed Claiming the Highlander's Heart, it was the warm and fuzzy I needed, but it does demand you accept extreme behavior from a character you barely know in the first few pages, and that’s pretty much my only complaint.

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Review: When Katie Met Cassidy, by Camille Perri

[fa icon="calendar'] Jul 12, 2018 10:00:00 AM / by Suzanne Krohn posted in review

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I was so excited to see a commercial f/f romantic comedy that I pre-ordered When Katie Met Cassidy, Camille Perri's second novel. It was pitched as laugh-out-loud funny, romantic, sexy, and thought-provoking, so even though I was wary of the Gay-For-You premise, I had high expectations. One of the things that Gay-For-You often signals is that a character is actually bisexual (or bi and demi) and as a bisexual reader, I am always on the hunt for representation in fiction.

The book let me down.

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Review: Love at Last Call, by M. Ullrich

[fa icon="calendar'] Jul 11, 2018 10:05:00 AM / by Suzanne Krohn posted in review

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This book was like a well-crafted cocktail - not too sweet, not too bitter, and left me with a warm feeling in my body. You've probably noticed by now that Margrethe and I tend not to have the best of luck with the subgenre of books called "lesfic," either because of bi-erasure, quality of writing/editing, egregious sexual assault, or racism. This book isn't any of that!

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Review: Worth the Wait, by Karelia Stetz-Waters

[fa icon="calendar'] Jul 9, 2018 10:00:00 AM / by Margrethe Martin posted in review

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This review might become a rant, I apologize in advance. 

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Review: Damaged Goods, by Talia Hibbert

[fa icon="calendar'] Jul 3, 2018 10:00:00 AM / by Dylan St. Jaymes posted in review

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Talia Hibbert blends heart, humor, and heat together to create a second chance romance that makes you believe first love can be lasting love, and even the bumpiest of roads can lead you home.

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Review: Unfit to Print, by KJ Charles

[fa icon="calendar'] Jul 2, 2018 10:00:00 AM / by Andrea Marks-Joseph posted in review

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I read Unfit to Print in one sitting, on a day as grey as the days in the book. It's a romance between two men of colour (!!!) set in November 1875, around Holywell Street in London, where Gil and Vikram spend most of their time by the fireplace. There's a blowjob scene where some serious blanket maneuvering is required so as not to freeze in the cold room. There's a cat called Satan, who spends a lot of time on Vikram's lap, and plays a sort of   Breakfast at Tiffany's   "then I'll give the cat a name!" role in Gil's life. And in an extremely British iconic move: there's a scene where hot tea used as a weapon! 
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Review: Out, Proud, and Prejudiced, by Megan Reddaway

[fa icon="calendar'] Jun 29, 2018 10:00:00 AM / by Margrethe Martin posted in review

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Out, Proud, And Prejudiced is a pretty direct retelling of Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice. Bennet is a student at a hospitality vocational school, struggling to pay the rent, and living with four other students (Jamie, Kofi, Leon, Charlotte), their landlord, and a cat (Mopsy). He’s also worried about getting a job in event planning after he graduates. Then, Tim and Darius stroll into town. Tim immediately falls for Jamie, and Bennet and Darius immediately butt heads.

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Review: A Gentleman's Position, by KJ Charles

[fa icon="calendar'] Jun 28, 2018 10:00:00 AM / by Eva Müller posted in review

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Before we get into Eva's review, you might want to read what we thought of the first two books in this series! We mention both A Fashionable Indulgence (Book 1) and A Seditious Affair (Book 2) in our Pride Month post for The Ripped Bodice's Summer BINGO.

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