Something New - Tales From a Makeshift Bride Cover
Title: Something New - Tales From a Makeshift Bride
Creators: Format: EBook Print
Color: Color
Romanceiness: Romantic Elements
Heat: PG13
Tags: straight memoir graphic novel
Where to Buy or Read:

Amazon

Buy it at your local bookshop!

Synopsis from the Creator:

In 2010, Lucy and her long-term boyfriend John broke up. Three long, lonely years later, John returned to New York, walked into Lucy's apartment, and proposed. This is not that story. It is the story of what came after: The Wedding.

DIY maven Lucy Knisley was fascinated by American wedding culture . . . but also sort of horrified by it. So she set out to plan and execute the adorable DIY wedding to end all adorable DIY weddings. And she succeeded. This graphic novel, Something New--clocking in at almost 300 pages of humor, despair, and eternal love--is the story of how Lucy built a barn, invented a whole new kind of photo booth, and managed to turn an outdoor wedding on a rainy day into a joyous (though muddy) triumph.

Love In Panels' Review:

SOMETHING NEW, Lucy Knisley's autobiographical graphic novel about her wedding, hits that indefinable spot somewhere between memoir and how-to. If you've read RELISH or any of her travelogues, you'll know what to expect from this one: humor, lots of internal dialogue, and a level of detail that makes you feel like you just might be Lucy's friend.

The narrative brings us through the early stages of Lucy and her now-husband John's relationship, a winding journey that includes a three year (!) break and a lot of back and forth regarding career, children, and life goals. As a bisexual woman, Lucy has complicated feelings on the institution of marriage, and she doesn't shy away from talking about them. John has complicated feelings about having children, and Lucy doesn't shy away from talking about those either. It's an honest, considerate depiction of the types of conversations I had with my own husband before our marriage. (Of course, I'm viewing this all through the lens of a married bisexual white woman, so Lucy's story probably has a lot more resonance for me than it would for others.)

After the engagement, Lucy employs self-deprecating humor and pointed social commentary as she guides readers through the long and tedious process of planning "the event of a lifetime." An entire chapter is devoted to finding "the dress," an experience that is supposed to be fun, but usually causes undue amounts of stress.

Chapters on food, money, pre-wedding parties, and "emotional sickness," cover most of the wedding bases, though the book clearly can't be a "how-to" because every couple, every venue, every family is different. For example, Knisley married at her mother's rural home, but that's not an option or a preference for many couples.

The end result is a book that's part critique of the wedding industry and societal expectations, part tribute to the love and support she received throughout the process, and part funny retelling of all the things not to do.

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[fa icon="calendar'] Feb 15, 2021 9:44:53 AM / by Suzanne posted in kickstarter, new comics

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For those of us who like to wait for the last issue of an indie comic to get in on the crowdfunding action, that time is here! (I already backed this once before, but still.) I Am Hexed, a queer comic with so many witches, launches its fourth and final Kickstarter on February 16th!

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[fa icon="calendar'] Jan 29, 2021 9:48:34 AM / by Press Release posted in new comics

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I don't do this often, but this comic looks so cute that I figured I'd share the announcement from Oni-Lion Forge!

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[fa icon="calendar'] Sep 15, 2020 9:45:00 AM / by Suzanne posted in review

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This is the book for you if you like:
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2) magic, used for both good and evil
3) a distinctive art style with emphasis on watery tones and pops of red
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The Daughters of Ys is a retelling of an old Breton folktale, set in a magically protected and constructed seaside city called Ys. (Similar to Atlantis, it's a magical city that's now sunken and never seen again.) The Queen, possessed of faerie magic, has just passed away and her two daughters are left with an irresponsible, grieving mess of a father. The elder sister takes to the countryside, bonding with animals and local people, even finding love with a commoner. The younger sister takes her anger and magic and uses them to keep the city going with her father. She does all the things no one else is willing to do and it's unclear whether she's actually "bad" or just does evil things. If she didn't do them, the city would fall into the sea and the sea monsters that guard it would attack all the inhabitants, so is all the murdering she does to feed the monsters and magic really that bad? Hmm.

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[fa icon="calendar'] Sep 8, 2020 11:51:21 AM / by Suzanne posted in review

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Come Together is a collection of erotic comics from a stellar group of comics creators. Many will be familiar to comics readers, including Niki Smith and Hari Conner, but several were new to me and I'm happy to have read them. One of my favorite things about anthologies is the opportunity to be exposed to new creators and Come Together didn't disappoint.

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[fa icon="calendar'] Jun 18, 2020 9:45:00 AM / by Suzanne posted in review

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You Brought Me the Ocean is an origin story for Aqualad, this time as a gay Black teen living in the US Southwest. So many secrets. His mother's been keeping him away for water his entire life, but why? What are the "birthmarks" on his arms and why do they glow when exposed to water? Is he gay? Why does everyone think he's dating his best friend Maria? And is it time to talk to the only out gay guy at school? Or do more than talk?

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[fa icon="calendar'] May 15, 2020 9:45:00 AM / by Suzanne posted in review

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DC continues to impress with their YA origin stories. We've reviewed several, with more to come soon, but this one was billed as a fantasy romance, so we decided to give it priority.

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[fa icon="calendar'] May 6, 2020 9:45:00 AM / by Suzanne posted in review

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I really needed something cute when I picked up Ghosted in L.A., and I'm happy to say that it delivered. Jewish college freshman Daphne has just followed her high school boyfriend to L.A. for school... only for him to break up with her right after they get there. Her roommate is a grouch and she's having a hard time making friends. One night, in a moment reminiscent of Beauty & the Beast, she falls onto the gate of an abandoned haunted mansion and it opens for her.

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[fa icon="calendar'] Apr 22, 2020 9:45:00 AM / by Suzanne posted in review

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Entry Number Three in the Quick and Easy Guides series from Oni Press/Limerence focuses on sex and disability. Unlike the previous two books, They/Them Pronouns and Queer and Trans Identities, this book seems more targeted toward disabled readers rather than an informative guide for abled readers. Topics include defining disability, consent, rejection, modifications for various disabilities and, largely, communication.

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