Spinning Cover
Title: Spinning
Creators: Format: EBook Print
Color: Color
Romanceiness: LGBTQ+ Elements
Heat: PG13
Tags: coming of age lesbian young adult
Where to Buy or Read:

Amazon

Synopsis from the Creator:

Ignatz Award winner Tillie Walden’s Spinning is a powerful graphic memoir that captures what it’s like to come of age, come out, and come to terms with leaving behind everything you used to know.

It was the same every morning. Wake up, grab the ice skates, and head to the rink while the world was still dark.

Weekends were spent in glitter and tights at competitions. Perform. Smile. And do it again.

She was good. She won. And she hated it.

For ten years, figure skating was Tillie Walden’s life. She woke before dawn for morning lessons, went straight to group practice after school, and spent weekends competing at ice rinks across the state. Skating was a central piece of her identity, her safe haven from the stress of school, bullies, and family. But as she switched schools, got into art, and fell in love with her first girlfriend, she began to question how the close-minded world of figure skating fit in with the rest of her life, and whether all the work was worth it given the reality: that she, and her friends on the team, were nowhere close to Olympic hopefuls. The more Tillie thought about it, the more Tillie realized she’d outgrown her passion—and she finally needed to find her own voice.

Love In Panels' Review:

With a whopping 400 pages, this book is something of a coming-of-age tome. With a spare, sketchlike style, Tillie Walden tells the story of her life as an ice skating child and teen.

Chapters are named after skating moves, a short description of the action mirroring the events of the story. Through skating, we see Tillie's yearning for acceptance and love: from other girls, from her coaches, from her family, from herself. Walden doesn't shy away from showing us her first love, her bouts of depression, and an assault by her SAT tutor. She lets readers feel the fear, heartbreak, and relief that she experiences while coming out as a teen.

While I spent about half of the book wondering "why the hell is she still skating if it makes her this miserable," Walden does answer that question. The "why" is inextricably tied in with Tillie's own struggle with self-acceptance and her need for approval. Even when she's being bullied at school, at the rink, at home, she still tries to put on a smile and do what is expected of her. This pushes her through skating, through middle school, through concealing her first relationship.

This is not a book for answers, however. Tillie's not perfect and doesn't pretend to be. She acknowledges that she might have saved everyone a lot of trouble by quitting skating earlier, and that she relied on one of her skating friends for a lot of support and friendship that she never really reciprocated. Rather than providing answers, this memoir offers readers a chance to consider the sacrifices we make for the things we could leave behind, and the confusing freedom that comes from breaking with routine and stepping into the unknown.

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[fa icon="calendar'] Jun 22, 2021 10:05:00 AM / by Suzanne posted in review

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I posted a bit about Embodied over on the Love in Panels Instagram account, but I loved this book so much I wanted to make sure it got to as many sets of eyes as possible.
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[fa icon="calendar'] Jun 8, 2021 11:38:05 AM / by Suzanne posted in review

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[fa icon="calendar'] Feb 15, 2021 9:44:53 AM / by Suzanne posted in kickstarter, new comics

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[fa icon="calendar'] Jan 29, 2021 9:48:34 AM / by Press Release posted in new comics

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I don't do this often, but this comic looks so cute that I figured I'd share the announcement from Oni-Lion Forge!

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[fa icon="calendar'] Sep 28, 2020 9:45:00 AM / by Suzanne posted in review

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This book is only for adult audiences. If you are not 18+, please close this window.

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[fa icon="calendar'] Sep 15, 2020 9:45:00 AM / by Suzanne posted in review

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[fa icon="calendar'] Jun 18, 2020 9:45:00 AM / by Suzanne posted in review

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You Brought Me the Ocean is an origin story for Aqualad, this time as a gay Black teen living in the US Southwest. So many secrets. His mother's been keeping him away for water his entire life, but why? What are the "birthmarks" on his arms and why do they glow when exposed to water? Is he gay? Why does everyone think he's dating his best friend Maria? And is it time to talk to the only out gay guy at school? Or do more than talk?

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[fa icon="calendar'] May 15, 2020 9:45:00 AM / by Suzanne posted in review

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DC continues to impress with their YA origin stories. We've reviewed several, with more to come soon, but this one was billed as a fantasy romance, so we decided to give it priority.

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